Double Gingerbread Scones

Our Double Gingerbread Scones earn their double gingerbread title from the twofold dose of ground and candied ginger in the dough. We also added old-fashioned oats to these Double Gingerbread Scones to make your winter morning breakfast a little heartier. 

Double Gingerbread Scones
 

Makes 8 scones
Ingredients
  • 2 cups (250 grams) all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup (60 grams) old-fashioned oats
  • ¼ cup (55 grams) firmly packed light brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) baking powder
  • 1½ teaspoons (3 grams) ground ginger
  • ½ teaspoon (1 gram) ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ cup (113 grams) cold unsalted butter, cubed
  • ½ cup (80 grams) diced candied ginger
  • ¼ cup (60 grams) plus 2 tablespoons
  • (30 grams) heavy whipping cream, divided
  • ¼ cup (85 grams) unsulphured molasses
  • 1 large egg (50 grams)
  • Turbinado sugar, for sprinkling
  • Scone Glaze (recipe follows)

Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C). Line a baking sheet with parchment.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, oats, brown sugar, baking powder, ground ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. Using a pastry blender, cut in cold butter until mixture is crumbly. Add candied ginger, tossing to combine.
  3. In a small bowl, combine ¼ cup (60 grams) cream, molasses, and egg. Add cream mixture to flour mixture, stirring until combined.
  4. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and gently knead up to 10 times. Pat dough into a 7-inch circle, about 1 inch thick. Cut dough into 8 wedges, and place on prepared pan. Brush top of scones with remaining 2 tablespoons (30 grams) cream, and sprinkle with turbinado sugar.
  5. Bake until dough no longer looks wet around the edges, 13 to 14 minutes. Let cool completely. Drizzle with Scone Glaze.

3.5.3251

Scone Glaze
 

Makes ⅓ cup
Ingredients
  • 1 cup (120 grams) confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) whole milk

Instructions
  1. In a small bowl, stir together confectioners’ sugar and milk.

3.5.3251

 

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St Lucia Buns

Every December 13, across the snowy towns of Scandinavia, families rise early in the dark to begin preparing for a centuries-old winter solstice celebration, a festival of lights. The eldest daughter of each household wakes first. Donning a white gown with a red sash and a candle-lit wreath crown, she carries a tray of brilliant golden St Lucia buns from room to room, singing carols and serving the sweet saffron-scented buns to family and friends in honor of St. Lucia. Soon they will take to the streets for a processional, where a girl—nominated by her town as “Lucia”—carries a basket of St. Lucia buns, handing them out to the merry masses. She is accompanied by girls in white dresses and boys with star-coned hats. They twirl and sing along the streets. This is St. Lucia Day.

You can’t talk about St Lucia buns without mentioning the shapes. The soft, supple dough allows for a variety of them—from a braided wreath to the wilder prästens hår (“priest’s hair”). The classic S shape, with each end of the dough rope curling up in an opposite direction, is the most common and easy to execute. The origin of the S shape and its connection with St. Lucia is fairly unknown, but there are several theories. The most prevalent is that the S is supposed to resemble curled-up cats, hence the name lussekatter. In his new cookbook, The Nordic Baking Book (Phaidon Press, 2018), Magnus Nilsson asserts that the real lussekatt shape has four curls, and the common S shape is actually called jugalt, which means “Christmas boar.” 

No matter the shape, St Lucia buns are vibrant enough to bring warmth to even the coldest of Scandinavian winters. In the spirit of this season, do as the Swedes and take to the kitchen to bake out the dark. Rest assured, St Lucia buns will bring the light.

These Swedish ST Lucia Buns are made with sour cream and vodka. The traditional version requires the saffron to infuse in vodka overnight so it can develop an intense color, but our method is much faster. 

St Lucia Buns
 

Makes 19 buns
Ingredients
  • ⅓ cup (67 grams) plus 1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated sugar, divided
  • ½ teaspoon saffron, lightly crushed
  • 1 tablespoon (15 grams) vodka
  • ⅔ cup (160 grams) plus 1 tablespoon (15 grams) whole milk, divided
  • 1 tablespoon (9 grams) active dry yeast
  • ⅓ cup (80 grams) sour cream, room temperature
  • 2 large eggs (100 grams), room temperature and divided
  • 4 cups (480 grams) all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon (9 grams) kosher salt
  • ½ cup (113 grams) unsalted butter, softened
  • Garnish: Swedish pearl sugar*

Instructions
  1. Using a mortar and pestle, grind together 1 tablespoon (12 grams) granulated sugar and saffron. Place in a small bowl, and add vodka. Let stand for at least 20 minutes.
  2. In a small saucepan, heat ⅔ cup (160 grams) milk and remaining ⅓ cup (67 grams) granulated sugar over low heat, stirring occasionally, until mixture registers 110°F (43°C) on an instant-read thermometer. Remove from heat. Whisk in yeast; let stand until mixture is foamy, about 10 minutes. Whisk in sour cream and 1 egg (50 grams); whisk in saffron mixture.
  3. In a large bowl, combine flour and salt. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, place yeast mixture. With mixer on low speed, gradually add half of flour mixture, beating until incorporated, 2 to 3 minutes. Add butter, 1 tablespoon (14 grams) at a time, letting each piece incorporate before adding the next, about 5 minutes total, stopping to scrape sides of bowl as needed. Gradually add remaining flour mixture, beating until incorporated. Continue beating until dough is smooth and elastic, about 16 minutes.
  4. Spray a large bowl with cooking spray. Shape dough into a smooth round, and place in bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°F/24°C) until doubled in size, about 1½ hours.
  5. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Punch down dough, and turn out onto a lightly floured surface. Divide dough into 19 (50-gram) pieces. (Keep dough covered while shaping so it does not dry out.) Roll each portion into a 12- to 13-inch rope, letting ends taper. Roll each end into a tight spiral in opposite directions, meeting in the middle to create an S shape. Place at least 3 inches apart on prepared pans. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°F/24°C) for 45 minutes.
  6. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C).
  7. In a small bowl, whisk together remaining 1 egg (50 grams) and remaining 1 tablespoon (15 grams) milk. Brush top and sides of each bun with egg wash. Top with pearl sugar, if desired.
  8. Bake until golden brown, 7 to 10 minutes, rotating pans halfway through baking. Let cool on a wire rack. Buns will keep for 3 to 4 days in an airtight container.

Notes
*We used Lars Own Swedish Pearl Sugar.

 

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Chestnut, Cranberry, and Rosemary Laminated Pain d’Épi

Fresh rosemary and fragrant chestnuts lend warm savory notes to this buttery Chestnut, Cranberry, Rosemary Laminated Pain d’Épi studded with sweet cranberries.

Chestnut, Cranberry, Rosemary Laminated Pain d’Épi
 

Makes 2 loaves
Ingredients
  • 3⅔ cups (466 grams) plus 1¼ cups (159 grams) bread flour, divided
  • 1¾ cups (420 grams) plus 2 teaspoons (10 grams) warm water (105°F/41°C to 110°F/43°C), divided
  • 2⅛ teaspoons (4 grams) instant yeast, divided
  • 6 teaspoons (18 grams) kosher salt, divided
  • 1 teaspoon (4 grams) granulated sugar
  • 1¼ cups (183 grams) Roasted Chestnuts (recipe follows), chopped
  • ¾ cup (96 grams) dried cranberries
  • ¾ cup (170 grams) unsalted butter, softened
  • 2 tablespoons (4 grams) chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 large egg (50 grams)
  • 2 cups (480 grams) ice water
  • ¼ cup (56 grams) olive oil

Instructions
  1. In a medium bowl, combine 1¼ cups (159 grams) flour, ½ cup
  2. (120 grams) warm water, and ⅛ teaspoon yeast. Cover with plastic wrap, and let stand at room temperature for 16 hours.
  3. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, beat yeast mixture, 1¼ cups (300 grams) warm water, 4 teaspoons (12 grams) salt, sugar, remaining 3⅔ cups (466 grams) flour, and remaining 2 teaspoons (4 grams) yeast at medium-low speed for 6 minutes. Increase mixer speed to medium, and beat for 2 minutes. Add Roasted Chestnuts and cranberries, beating just until combined, about 1 minute. Shape dough into a ball.
  4. Spray a large bowl with cooking spray. Place dough in bowl, turning to grease top. Cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°F/24°C) until doubled in size, about 1 hour. Between 2 sheets of plastic wrap, shape butter into a 10×8-inch rectangle. Sprinkle with rosemary, and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 20 minutes or up to 24 hours. Let stand at room temperature for 10 minutes before using.
  5. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C). Position oven rack to lowest level, and place a large cast-iron skillet on rack. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  6. Freeze dough for 10 minutes. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 16×10-inch rectangle. Unwrap butter block, and place in center of rectangle. Fold dough edges over to enclose butter block. Roll dough into a 24×8-inch rectangle. Fold one short side over 3 inches. Fold other short side over 9 inches, making ends meet. Fold dough in half, creating an 8×6-inch rectangle. Roll into an 18×8-inch rectangle. Fold dough into thirds, like a letter, creating an 8×6-inch rectangle. Cover with plastic wrap, and let rest for 10 minutes.
  7. Roll dough into a 19×11-inch rectangle. Trim ½ inch off all sides of dough. Cut dough in half lengthwise, creating 2 (18×5-inch) rectangles. Starting at one long side, roll up 1 rectangle, pinching seam to seal. Transfer to prepared pan. Repeat with remaining dough.
  8. Using kitchen scissors, make a 45-degree cut into dough 1 inch from end, leaving about ¼ inch of dough uncut. (Be careful not to cut all the way through dough.) Lay dough piece over to one side. Make another 1-inch cut, and lay to other side. Repeat process until you reach end of dough. Repeat with remaining loaf.
  9. In a small bowl, whisk together egg and remaining 2 teaspoons (10 grams) warm water. Brush egg wash onto dough. Pour 2 cups (480 grams) ice water in cast-iron skillet, and place loaves in hot oven.
  10. Bake until deep golden brown, 25 to 30 minutes. Brush with oil, and sprinkle with remaining 2 teaspoons (6 grams) salt. Let cool slightly on a wire rack. Serve warm. Store in airtight container at room temperature for up to 4 days.

Roasted Chestnuts
 

Makes about 4 cups
Ingredients
  • 6 cups (892 grams) whole chestnuts in shells

Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425°F (220°C). Using a sharp paring knife, cut an “X” in rounded side of chestnuts. (This lets steam escape, and will prevent them from exploding.) Place on a rimmed baking sheet, cut side up.
  2. Roast until shells curl away from nutmeats, 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. Wrap hot chestnuts in a kitchen towel, and squeeze gently to further loosen shells. Let stand until cool enough to handle. Peel shells from nutmeats. Use immediately, or store in a resealable plastic bag at room temperature for up to 24 hours.

 

The post Chestnut, Cranberry, and Rosemary Laminated Pain d’Épi appeared first on Bake from Scratch.

The most yummy of all – sourdough chocolate babka

I just realized I’ve only been posting sweet breads lately (haven’t heard anyone complaining though, which is a good thing).

It must be I’m compensating for something I’m missing in my life or just pure challenge and yumminess of the sweet dough. Whenever I can, I dream about soft, buttery dough and melting rich dark chocolate between shreadable layers.

I’ve been dreaming about babka for a long time. And I’ve tried my luck couple of times, but I wasn’t quite happy with the result. It was either too dry, to hard or not sweet.

Last week I was really amazed by all of your comments, kind words and your ideas on what you would like to try and bake in my last post. Some of you wrote you would like to bake babka. I was intrigued!

I tried it again this weekend and it came out perfectly. So today I would like to share the recipe for sourdough chocolate babka. The secret here is that I used very soft brioche dough that I also used for hot cross buns. What I find important is that one type of dough can be used for so many purposes. If you find one that works, stick to it 🙂

Hop on this sourdough babka trip with me! Only sweet, delicious, chocolaty and buttery things ahead.


GIVEAWAY –  cookbook Beyond the Plate – Top Food Blogs from around the World:
The winner of the giveaway was randomly selected among all the entries.
The winner is: Kathy Stahl. Congratulations! Please drop an e-mail to natasa@mydailysourdoughbread.com.
To all others who participated – big thank you!



Sourdough chocolate babka

Sourdough chocolate babka
Yields: 2 medium-sized babkas

Baking schedule:
The dough for the babka was mixed in the late afternoon, left to rise for 2 hours at room temperature, put in the fridge overnight, shaped in the morning, left to rise for couple of hours and baked in the afternoon of that day. 

Ingredients:

Note: Baker’s percentages are put in brackets if you would like to scale up or down the formula.

Starter
80 g white wheat flour (bread flour)
20 g brown sugar
25 g active mother sourdough starter
35 g water

Dough
350 g white wheat flour (bread flour) (100%)
all of the above starter (appr. 160g) (42%)
2 eggs (appr. 100 g) (28%)
50 g brown sugar (12%)
85 g unsalted softened butter (24%)
7 g salt (2%)
110 g milk (31%)  *

* NOTE: Please feel free to add more liquid (steps of 10 g), if you feel the dough is too stiff and all the flour is difficult to incorporate. Don’t be tempted to add a lot of liquid as you add butter in the second stage of dough mixing which softens the dough.

Chocolate filling
130 g melted dark chocolate (I used 70%)
120 g melted butter
10 g cocoa powder
10 g powdered brown sugar
50 g roughly chopped chocolate or chocolate chips (optional)

Instructions:

Sourdough starter
1. In the morning, prepare your sourdough starter. The starter will be stiff, more like a dough. Leave it to ferment until doubled in volume. This may take from 4-12 hours, depending on the environment temperature and strength of your mother starter. If your starter doubles very fast but you are not ready to make the dough, put the jar in the fridge.

Dough
2. In the late afternoon mix the dough. /NOTE: I used mixer to knead the dough. / In a large mixing bowl put milk, starter, sugar, eggs, flour and salt. Mix everything together. If the dough feels dry, don’t be tempted to add too much of additional liquid – mixing in the butter in the following phase will soften the dough (experiment with the softness of the dough) – but do add the liquid if you can’t incorporate all the flour. Knead the dough for 3-4 minutes and then leave it to rest for 15-20 minutes.

3. Next, knead in half of the butter quantity. Once completely integrated, add and knead in the other half. Knead the dough for 8-10 minutes (it is advisable to use mixer) until smooth and elastic – check how transparent can the dough be if you stretch it. If you feel the gluten is not developing well, leave the dough to rest for 15 minutes and you will be able to notice the change. Shape the dough into ball and place it into clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to ferment at the room temperature for 2 hours, then put the bowl into the fridge overnight.

4. In the morning, first prepare the filling. Mix together melted chocolate and melted butter, cocoa powder and powdered sugar. The batter will be runny. Put the filling to a fridge for at least half an hour or until the batter starts to thicken up and feel spreadable (like Nutella for example) – see photos below.
Also, prepare two tins and line them with parchement paper. I used one 25 cm (9.8 in) long and other 18 cm (7 in) long.

5. When the filling is ready, take the dough out of the fridge and place it on slighlty floured surface. Roll the dough into sqaure measuring approximately 45×45 cm (appr.18×18 in) and to be 4-5 mm thick. When done, spread the filling across the dough, leaving 1-1.5 cm (half inch) edge. If you want, sprinkle some roughly chopped chocolate or chocolate chips across the dough. Tightly roll the dough into log. Trim the ends if necessary.


Sourdough chocolate babka

6. Next, take a sharp knife and cut the log in half lengthwise all the way through – see the photo below. To shape the babka, take one half and place it over the other and than simply braid these two halves. Cut the braided dough to fit your tins.

7. Leave the babkas to rise until approximately doubled in volume. Final rise may take 4-7 hours, it’s temperature depending. My needed 5 hours. When the babkas are almost risen, preheat the oven to 220°C/428°F.  Put in the oven and bake for 10 minutes at 220°C/428°F, then decrease to 200°C/392°C and bake for another 30-40 minutes or until nicely baked.


Sourdough chocolate babka

8. When baked, take the babkas from the tins and leave them to cool on a cooling rack. If eaten fresh, the babka will literally melt in your mouth, it’s so soft.


Sourdough chocolate babka

Don’t forget to share the experience if you try them – tag me with @mydailysourdoughbread on Instagram or let me know in the comment below 😉

The post The most yummy of all – sourdough chocolate babka appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.

Beyond the Plate cookbook and Scrumptious sourdough hot cross buns

This is slightly long post, but hang on, there are just good and delicious things here!

First, I have an announcement to make.

I am beyond happy and grateful to announce that My Daily Sourdough Bread blog is featured in newly published book called Beyond the Plate – Top Food Blogs from around the World published by Prestel Publishing.

Prestel publishing is one of the world’s leading illustrated book publishers with a stunning list of beautifully crafted books on all aspects of art, photography and design.

Accompanied by amazing creatives who are my greatest inspiration like Local Milk, Hortus Cuisine, Lab Noon, Krautkopf etc. I am very grateful for the opportunity to share my love for sourdough baking and photography. Being so diverse in recipes and stories by each blogger from around the world, the book is a perfect gift for everyday cooking. The book is now available worldwide.

Aaaaand: To celebrate this publishing occasion, Prestel publishing and My daily sourdough bread are giving one copy of the book to one lucky winner.

Beyond the plate cookbook
Beyond the plate cookbook

EDITED – the giveaway is now closed.
GIVEAWAY

To enter the giveaway, leave a comment below and tell me what type of bread from around the world would you like to try or bake?

Giveaway is open until next Wednesday. Good luck!

The winner will be randomly selected and notified via e-mail.


So, the second thing is: I can’t believe I didn’t know how good the hot cross buns are!! It’s like I was living in a cave for the past 30 years. The reason I even thought of making hot cross buns was the jar of rum macerated raisins I’d prepared  three weeks ago.

I didn’t have any goals of using these raisins, I just like the flavors and smell when rum is combined with lemon and orange peel and vanilla powder. You should definitely try this at home. 

As the raisins kept soaking and with the Easter approaching, I thought I’d try something new this year. In Slovenia, potica (a walnut roll) is usually eaten for Easter. But this year I crave freshness, textures and different flavors with a bang.

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten in New Zealand, Australia, Caribbean, Great Britain and Canada at Great Friday just before the Easter.

For me, they are definitely a year round keeper. Being very soft, they are perfect for breakfast, for lunch dessert or as a simple snack.


Sourdough hot cross buns

Scrumptious sourdough hot cross buns
Yields: 12 buns

Baking schedule:
The dough for these hot cross buns was mixed in the late afternoon, left to rise for 2 hours at room temperature, put in the fridge overnight, shaped in the morning, left to rise for couple of hours and baked in the afternoon of that day. 

Ingredients:

Note: Baker’s percentages are put in brackets if you would like to scale up or down the formula.

Starter
80 g white wheat flour (bread flour)
20 g brown sugar
25 g active mother sourdough starter
35 g water

Dough
350 g white wheat flour (bread flour) (100%)
all of the above starter (appr. 160g) (42%)
2 eggs (appr. 100 g) (28%)
50 g brown sugar (12%)
85 g unsalted softened butter (24%)
7 g salt (2%)
110 g milk (31%)  **
90 g raisins, soaked in rum (25%) ***
lemon zest of one lemon
orange zest of one orange
pinch of ground cloves
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg

** NOTE: Please feel free to add more liquid (steps of 10 g), if you feel the dough is too stiff and all the flour is difficult to incorporate. Don’t be tempted to add a lot of liquid as you add butter in the second stage of dough mixing which softens the dough.

*** I used rum macerated raisins. This means I mixed rum, raisins, vanilla powder, lemon and orange peel and left the mixture to soak for about three weeks to get the heavenly taste and flavors. If you don’t have raisins prepared in this way, just soak the raisins in rum at about same time you prepare the starter for the dough. Soaked raisins will add moisture to the dough and extra flavor dimension compared to dry ones.

Hot cross paste
70 g flour (I used the same flour as in the dough)
20 g oil (I used sunflower oil)
60 g water

Vanilla sugar glaze
1 tbs brown sugar
1 tbs boiling hot water
pinch of vanilla powder

Instructions:

Sourdough starter
1. In the morning, prepare your sourdough starter. The starter will be stiff, more like a dough. Leave it to ferment until doubled in volume. This may take from 4-12 hours, depending on the environment temperature and strength of your mother starter. If your starter doubled very fast but you are not ready to make the dough, put the jar in the fridge.

Dough
2. In the late afternoon mix the dough. /NOTE: I used mixer to knead the dough. / In a large mixing bowl put milk, starter, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, eggs, flour and salt. Mix everything together. If the dough feels dry, don’t be tempted to add too much of additional liquid – mixing in the butter in the following phase will soften the dough (experiment with the softness of the dough) – but do add the liquid if you can’t incorporate all the flour. Knead the dough for 3-4 minutes and then leave it to rest for 15-20 minutes.

3. Next, knead in half of the butter quantity. Once completely integrated, add and knead in the other half. Knead the dough for 8-10 minutes (it is advisable to use mixer) until smooth and elastic – check how transparent can the dough be if you stretch it. Leave the dough to rest for 5 minutes, then knead in the raisins, orange and lemon peel. Shape the dough into ball and place it into clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to ferment at the room temperature for 2 hours, then put the bowl into the fridge overnight.

4. In the morning, take the dough out of the fridge and divide it into 12 pieces, each weighing around 73-74 g. Shape each piece into a ball and place it on slightly floured tray lined with parchement paper. When done, cover the tray with clingfilm – this will prevent the dough from drying out. Leave the balls to rise until passing the poking test (appr. doubled in volume) – make an indent – if the indent comes back quickly, leave them to ferment a little bit more. Final rise may take 4-7 hours, it’s temperature depending.


Sourdough hot cross buns

5. When the balls are almost risen, preheat the oven to 220°C/428°F.  Just before putting the pan into oven spread the hot cross paste across the buns. Put in the oven and bake for 10 minutes at 220°C/428°F, then decrease to 200°C/392°C and bake for another 20 minutes or until golden brown.


Sourdough hot cross buns

6. When you take the pan out of the oven, immediately brush the buns with sugar glaze. Leave the buns to cool down a little bit. These buns are the best when eaten slightly warm 🙂


Sourdough hot cross buns

Softness at its best.

Sourdough hot cross buns
Sourdough hot cross buns

Don’t forget to share the experience if you try them – tag me with @mydailysourdoughbread on Instagram or let me know in the comment below 😉

The post Beyond the Plate cookbook and Scrumptious sourdough hot cross buns appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.

The softest sourdough doughnuts with strawberry and apple pie cream – upgraded version

Remember this sourdough doughnut recipe from exactly two years ago? This has been the most popular recipe on the blog, which kind of makes me think that nothing can’t stop us from eating a delicious doughnut.

I learned a lot about dough since then and today is the official start of the carnival season, so called Fat Thursday – so, can there be a better way to celebrate this but with super soft sourdough doughnuts recipe?
The difference to the previous recipe is that I mix in the butter in the second step of dough making and that I also leave the dough to cool down and ferment in the fridge which also helps to bring out some flavour. The additon of butter makes the dough really soft and fluffy. 

So, whether you call them doughnuts, berliners, bomboloni, paczki or something different – wait no more, the recipe awaits – worth of every minute, I promise.


Sourdough doughnuts

The softest sourdough doughnuts
Yields: 15 doughnuts

Baking schedule:
The dough for these sourdough doughnuts was mixed in the afternoon, left to rise for 3-4 hours at room temperature to increase the volume, put in the fridge overnight, shaped in the morning, left to rise and fried in the afternoon of that day. 

Ingredients:

Note: Baker’s percentages are put in brackets if you would like to scale up or down the formula.

Starter
90 g white wheat flour (bread flour)
20 g powdered brown sugar
25 g active sourdough starter
40 g water

Dough
500 g white wheat flour (bread flour) (100%)
all of the above starter (appr. 175g)
3 eggs (appr. 165 g)
60 g brown sugar (12%)
10 g rum (appr. 1 tbsp) (2%)
10 g salt (2%)
110 g milk or water (22%) – I used milk  **
pinch of vanilla
lemon zest of one lemon
120 g softened butter (24%)

** NOTE: Please feel free to add more liquid (20-50 g) more, if you feel the dough is too stiff and your flour can absorb more liquid. The dough should be soft, not runny but also not too stiff.

oil for frying
sugar for coating

Filling
strawberry  crème légère – I used this recipe
or
apple pie cream (for this, I first cut apples into small pieces and sauteed them on the butter until soft. I then added cinnamon, vanilla powder, brown sugar and little bit of lemon juice. Next, I blended everything in a blender and let the batter cool down completely in the fridge. When cooled I mixed it into the whipped cream and seasoned to taste with additional cinnamon and vanilla powder.

Instructions:

Sourdough starter
1. In the morning, prepare your sourdough starter. The starter will be stiff, more like a dough. Leave it to ferment until risen, puffed, and active. This may take from 4-12 hours, depending on the temperature and strength of your starter.

Dough
2. In the evening/late afternoon mix the dough. First, dissolve your entire starter in 110 g of milk. Add all other ingredients, except for the butter. Mix everything together. If the dough feels dry, don’t be tempted to add too much of additional liquid – mixing in the butter in the following phase will soften the dough (experiment with the softness of the dough) – but do add the liquid if the dough is too stiff. Knead the dough for 5-6 minutes and then leave it to rest for 15-20 minutes.

3. Next, knead in half of the butter quantity. Once completely integrated, add and knead in the other half. Knead the dough for 8-10 minutes (it is advisable to use mixer) until smooth. Shape the dough into ball and place it into clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to ferment at the room temperature for 3-4 hours until the volume increases by half of the initial state, then put the bowl into the fridge overnight.

4. In the morning, take the dough out of the fridge and divide it into 15 pieces, each weighing 70 g. Shape each piece into a ball and place it on slightly floured tray lined with parchement paper. Cover the tray with clingfilm – this will prevent the dough from drying out. Leave the balls to rise until passing the poking test (appr. doubled in volume) – make an indent – if the indent comes back quickly, leave them to ferment a little bit more. Final rise may take 4-7 hours, it’s temperature depending.


Sourdough doughnuts

5. When the balls are risen enough, prepare the frying oil. Heat to 175-180°C/347-356°F. If the oil isn’t hot enough, the doughnuts will soak the oil and be greasy. If the oil is too hot,  the doughnuts will cook very fast on the outside, but will be unbaked inside, so make sure it’s at the right temperature. It is advisable to sacrifice one doughnut to see how it bakes. Also, keep in mind that at the end of frying the oil becomes hotter.


Sourdough doughnuts

6. Fry each doughnut for 2-3 minutes on one side (or until nicely brown) and 2 minutes on another side. When fried, transfer them onto a plate lined with a napkin, so they soak up the excessive fat.

7. Dust the doughnuts with powdered sugar (or roll them into sugar), then leave them to cool down before filling them.

8. To fill the doughnuts, make a short incision with the knife, then use a pastry bag to fill them with the filling of your choice.

You’ll have to excuse me for not having a crumb photo and trust me that the crumb is super super soft and airy at the same time. The reason for not having a crumb photo is because I gave some doughnuts away to friend and other were eaten before having a chance to bring them in front of camera.

UPDATE: I made another batch of these delicious doughnuts (with white chocolate cream with grated dark chocolate and orange zest) and I managed to take a photo of the crumb before eating them 🙂


Sourdough doughnuts

Sourdough doughnuts

What is your favorite doughnut filling?

Don’t forget to share the experience if you try them – tag me with @mydailysourdoughbread or let me know 😉

The post The softest sourdough doughnuts with strawberry and apple pie cream – upgraded version appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.

Homebaker’s guide to natural bread coloring

Winter is perfect time to slow our lives down, to set up some goals, to decrease all the hype , to take well deserved rest, and get grounded again for new adventures. But sometimes, the winter gets too greyish, monotonous, and blues-y. It’s when there might be no Sun for weeks and when all the green turns into pale memory and snow covers what might have survived the sharp cold.

Then, I know, it’s time to bring some joy and twists into bread baking. Today, we are going to talk about how to color your dough with natural colors.

Before we dive into colors, I would like to point out some tips and directions to consider in order to avoid surprises:

1. There are many ways of making your bread colorful. The most common ones I go for are:
– liquid (fresh vegetable or fruit juice)
– powder (dry spices and herbs or dried vegetable and fruit parts)
– pureé (mashed vegetables or fruits)
There are some other ways, like concentrated vegetable or fruit syrups or as @table_fable suggested on instagram adding (powder or herb) infused oils to the dough.

2. Color is also a flavor.
Keep in mind that with larger doses (of powder or liquid) you might reach the inedible limit very fast – imagine putting too much cocoa, cinnamon or charcoal powder into the dough. I have experienced this issue with using too much fresh red cabagge juice. The color was beautifully pink, but the taste was very strong – only for real red cabagge lovers (don’t say I didn’t warn you :)). One thing to consider is also the use of the final product – don’t use fruit teas to color the dough, if you know you’re going to eat the bread with savory.

3. Get most of the food coloring by examining it.
If you juice your vegetables, you will notice that some vegetable juices often turn brown very quickly – the juice oxidizes. There is no difference when adding the juice to the dough. The most common color intensity loss will occur with spinach, carrot, parsley, and beetroot juice. The solution to this is adding some acidic substance to the juice, like lemon juice, buttermilk or vinegar.

Also, if not sure what the juice color intensity will be in the dough, check how translucent the liquid looks. The more transparent the liquid, the less intensive the color in the final product.


Note: this post will be regularly updated with new experiments and findings about dough coloring. Feel free to join the fun here on or my Instagram and Facebook accounts.


Yellow

– turmeric powder (for the bread on the photo below I put 1 tsp per 250 g of flour) or turmeric juice
– safrron
– egg yolks (applicable for sweet doughs)


Yellow sourdough bread

Coloured with turmeric powder.

Orange

– carrot juice or powder
– pumpkin juice or pureé (see the recipe here)
– paprika powder


Orange sourdough bread

Left coloured with pumpkin puree, right coloured with fresh carrots juice.

Red

– hibiscus
– beetroot juice or powder

Pink

– raspberries
– red cabbage juice (experiment with cooked cabbage juice or adding a little bit of baking soda for blue)
– purple potato


Pink sourdough bread

Coloured with fresh red cabagge juice.

Purple

– purple carrots
– blueberries
– purple potatoes
– walnuts (walnuts contain tannins which give the dough greyish-purple-lavender hue)


Purple sourdough bread

Coloured with fresh purple carrots juice.

Green

– spinach
– matcha powder
– vegetable chlorophyll
– algae like spirulina and chlorella powder


Green sourdough bread

Coloured with fresh spinach juice.

Blue

This is the only color I haven’t tried experimenting with. One of the reasons might be that blue isn’t really the color you would connect to food and eating (unicorn cakes don’t count!). In food psychology, blue is considered as appetite suppressant and it is therefore very advisable to use blue at meals when wanting to lose weight (using blue plates for example). In nature, blue food is very rare, actually, I don’t remember any at the moment (except for some flowers and I don’t consider blueberries blue :)).

I’m planning to experiment with blue in next weeks. Wish me luck!

Brown (rye malt, cacao)

– rye/barley malt (see the recipe here)
– cocoa powder
– cinnamon
– coffee

You can check a great tutorial for zebra effect (right photo below) on this link. Try experimenting with different color combinations, it’s fun.


Brown sourdough bread

Coloured with cacao powder.


Brown sourdough bread

Coloured with rye malt.

Black / grey

Black is, same as blue, relatively unappealing color when it comes to food. My experience with sharing black bread is doubt mixed with curiosity at first, and excitement after trying it.

– activated charcoal powder (see the photo below, get the recipe here)
– squid ink
– large quantities of raw cocoa powder


Charcoal sourdough bread

Coloured with charcoal powder.


Have you tried bread coloring?
What is your favorite color?
What is your best experience and best tip for getting intense colors?

I would love to hear from you, let me know in a comment below, I’m looking forward! 🙂



The post Homebaker’s guide to natural bread coloring appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.

Sourdough brioche chocolate hazelnut rolls

Hello world! It’s what you usually write when you publish your first post, right? Well, this is my first post this year, though it looks like I’ve got stuck somewhere in August 🙂

Time flies really fast. It flies even faster when you’re involved in too many things and you forget to breathe in between to become even aware of it. It flies fast when you don’t focus on yourself and your goals but always make others a priority and always act as pleaser. Or when you forget why you do things you do in the first place. Time flies fast when you allow others to lead your life. And when you compare yourself to others thinking you’re not good enough even when you pour all yourself into what you do.

When I get stuck, I return to sourdough baking. It helps me to simplify things and to feel grounded again. It’s when I know why I do it. It’s because I love to learn and experience new things and new flavours. Lately, I’ve been experimenting with brioche style dough. The brioche dough is perfect for soft rolls and you can use it to make other sourdough goodies, like this chocolate cinnamon twist bread.

What have you been baking in the meantime? Any delicious recipe to try out? Let me know in a comment below.

I invite you to follow more of my sourdough adventures on Instagram.


Sourdough brioche chocolate hazelnut rolls

Sourdough brioche chocolate hazelnut rolls
Yields: 9-10 rolls

Baking schedule:
The dough for this rolls was prepared in the evening, left to rise overnight, put in the fridge to consolidate, shaped in the morning, and left to rise at the room temperature. The rolls were baked on the second day.

Ingredients:

Note: Baker’s percentages are put in brackets if you would like to scale up or down the formula.

Starter
75 g water
75 g strong white wheat flour
1 heaping tablespoon of your (active) sourdough starter

Dough
all of the above starter
400 g strong white wheat flour (100%)
150 g milk (37.5%)
1 egg
1 egg yolk
40 g of caster sugar (10%)
7 g salt ( 1.75%)
130 g butter, cubed and slightly soft but still cold (32.5%)

Filling
150 g roasted and ground hazelnuts
180 g melted dark chocolate

Instructions:

Sourdough starter
1.  In the morning, prepare your sourdough starter. Mix 75 g of white wheat flour, 75 g of water, and 1 heaping tablespoon of your base sourdough starter. Leave it to ferment until risen, puffed, active and bubbly. This may take from 4-12 hours, depending on the temperature and strength of your starter.

Dough
2. In the evening/late afternoon mix the dough. First, dissolve your entire starter in 150 g of milk. Add all other ingredients, except for the butter. Mix everything together. If the dough feels dry, don’t be tempted to add much of additional liquid – mixing in the butter in the following phase will soften the dough. Knead the dough for 5-6 minutes and then leave it to rest for 15-20 minutes.

3. Next, knead in half of the butter quantity. Once completely integrated, add and knead in the other half. Knead the dough for 8-10 minutes (it is advisable to use mixer) until smooth. Shape the dough into ball and place it into clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to ferment overnight in a cool place until almost doubled in volume. Keep an eye on the dough, you don’t want to overproof it.

4. When the dough is ready, put it in the fridge for at least 1 hour, preferably more. This is an important step which will enable easier (non-sticky) shaping afterword.


Sourdough brioche chocolate hazelnut rolls

5. When you are ready to shape the rolls, prepare the filling. Mix the roasted and ground hazelnuts (I roasted them for 15 minutes at 160°C) and melted chocolate. Also, take your dutch oven (or any other round pan) and grease it with butter and lightly dust it with flour.

Shaping
6. Roll the dough to be 5 mm thick or 30×45 cm (12×18 inch) wide. Drop the filling across the rolled dough and spread it thinly, leaving 1 cm (1/2 inch) space from all sides.

7. Roll the dough from the longest side in the direction away from you to get a log. Cut the log into pieces using a sharp knife or a piece of thread. Place the rolls into the pan.

Final rise
Leave the dough to rise at the room temperature until puffed. This step is temperature depending, it can take anything from 1 to 3 hours.


Sourdough brioche chocolate hazelnut rolls

Baking
Thirty minutes before the baking, preheat the oven to 200°C (375°F) or 180°C (356°F) with the fan oven. When the dough is ready, put the pan oven into oven and bake the rolls until well baked, 30-40 minutes. Leave to cool slightly on the rack. Best when eaten warm.


What is your favorite rolls filling?

Let me know if you try them – tag me on Instagram (@mydailysourdoughbread) or drop a comment below 🙂

See you soon!


The post Sourdough brioche chocolate hazelnut rolls appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.

How to fit sourdough baking into your daily schedule?

“Oh, sourdough, I know it’s so healthy, but it takes two days to make it, right?” and “Sourdough bread baking just takes so much time and I should be at home all the time, I couldn’t do it!”, are the sentences I here most often when I say I bake sourdough bread.

Well, the answer is yes, sourdough baking takes a reasonable amount of time. But this isn’t really your time, i.e. the time you would spent on making bread. The most of this time is waiting for the bacteria and yeast to do their job. Feeling releaved? Read on.

Most importantly, baking sourdough bread doesn’t require you staying at home. However, preparing and fermenting sourdough while being away in some parts of the day will require some understanding of fermentation principles and planning ahead (similar to life, right?). Let’s look into steps on how to fit sourdough baking into your daily routine.

Steps towards fitting sourdough into your daily life

1. Understand how fermentation works

Temperature of the water, temperature of the environment, flours used, and amount of starter in the dough are the variables that affect the dynamics of sourdough bread fermentation the most. By changing those variables you can easily adjust the time of the dough fermentation to fit to your absence from home. Increase the temperature and amount of starter and your dough will ferment faster and vice versa. Getting to the right temperatures and right amounts of starter will take a little bit of experimenting in order to avoid overproofed dough when coming back home. This is especially important in summer when temperatures get high.

2. Get clear on what kind of bread you would like to bake and then plan (ahead) wisely

Different types of dough (or better to say types of bread) might require different approaches of handling the dough. In all cases, baking will require planning ahead and adjusting the recipes to fit the times when you are at home and when you can work with dough (i.e. before work, after work, etc.)

Two easiest sourdough breads that you can make while away are the sourdough sandwich loaf baked in a tin and sourdough focaccia baked in a tray. With both doughs you would simply mix the dough, knead it for couple of minutes to develop strength of the dough, transfer it to a greased pans, leave it to ferment until doubled in volume, and then bake it. Easy, right?


Sandwich loaf

I usually mix the dough for sandwich bread or focaccia in the morning before going to work and, depending on the season, I leave it to ferment at the room temperature or in basement until I come home in the afternoon. In the best case scenario, the dough is ready to be put in oven in an hour after I come home (while the oven preheats). It is better to come home to slighlty underproofed dough than to overproofed one, where there is almost no way back. 

You can make both types of bread in the afternoon in shorter amount of time, by simply mixing the dough with larger amounts of starter which will make the dough to ferment faster (also put the dough into warm place). In this way, you can have simple (yet very delicious) breads for dinner.

Using seasonal fruits in focaccias is one way of upgrading your sourdough bread and it’s basically making two in one – bread and dessert.


Focaccia

3. Make fridge your best friend

When I discovered fridge, I became one happy baker, or at least to say, I got more sleep. Putting the dough into the fridge after the bulk fermentation at the room temperature allowed me to go sleeping and to avoid overproofed dough in the morning. Using the fridge, my dough was ready to be put in the oven when I woke up in the morning. (OK, I once forgot to put the dough into the fridge and the scene in the morning was not pleasant.)

Fridge can serve you for choosing a cold bulk fermentation or cold final rise of the dough (or both). In both cases, the signs of the proper development of the dough are the same as in fermenting your dough at the room temperatures.

In addition to solving the sleeping issues, cold fermentation also brings out the special character of the dough, bringing out the subtle edgy sourness of the bread and making it extremely delicious.

Before you put the dough into the fridge, just make sure you cover it with a plastic bag or someting similar as the fridge dries up things.

4. Experiment and repeat

Practice make perfect (bread). As you will observe how your dough acts under different circumstances, you will be able to judge the temperature and the amount of starter needed to get to the wanted step of bread baking.


Sourdough loaf

What are your biggest challenges when it comes to baking sourdough during the busy days? How do you organize your baking? Let me know in a comment below.

The post How to fit sourdough baking into your daily schedule? appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.

Step by step beginner’s guide to perfect sourdough bread

I’m not going to lie – my first sourdough bread was a brick. In was in 2011, when I started my sourdough bread baking journey. I got myself Chad Robertson’s book Tartine Bread and a dutch oven in a hope to get that perfect crunchy crust and tender soft crumb. First, it took me a while to make sourdough starter (I blame winter for this), and the dough was anything but rising. My transition to sourdough bread was due to health issues, so I thought it would be a great choice to stick to the whole grain flours to make my first sourdough bread.  Let’s say this wasn’t the smartest idea. Looking back, all I was missing to make good looking and tasty sourdough bread was tools, some essential tips and awareness about the dough.

Today I know I need to first know the flours I’m using and to feel the dough in order to know when to move to the next step.

I hope this (lengthy, khm) step-by-step guide makes you curious and motivated to make your own sourdough bread. Don’t be scared about how long this post is – the amount of your presence in making sourdough bread is shorter than the time you needed to read this post.

Let’s go!


Before we dive into the detailed instructions, I would like to invite you to the three part background series of tips, tricks and secrets of sourdough baking. If I had these advice when I started, I would be one happy baker.
Part 1: Six biggest challenges when starting sourdough baking and how to overcome them?
Part 2: 7 essential keys to sourdough baking
Part 3: Do you recognize 3 early warning signs of underproofed bread?



Beginners sourdough bread

TOOLS

In basisc, you will need:

– a bowl for mixing the dough
– dough spatula or (and) bench knife for handling and cutting the dough
– digital scale to measure the ingredients
– bread rising basket (banetton) – I used 20 cm (8″) wide basket
– dutch oven for baking (or baking stone)
– blade or sharp knife for scoring the dough

If you don’t have all the tools at home, there is plenty of space for improvisation. Check also my article at Food52 about 10 essential tools for sourdouhg baking at home.

BAKING SCHEDULE

Starter for this bread was prepared in the evening and left to rise overnight. Just after preparing the starter, I also mixed the flour and water and left it for autolyse until the next morning when I added sourdough starter and left it to rest for another hour. After one hour of rest, I added salt and left the dough to bulk ferment for three hours to build the strength of the dough.  After the bulk fermentation, the bread was preshaped, left to rest on the bench for 15 minutes, shaped and put into rising basket. It was left to rise for three hours at the room temperature (summer) and then baked in a dutch oven – 20 minutes with the steam and 25 minutes without steam.

As you will see below, I didn’t write down the exact time of the steps, only the time needed in my case. There is a lot of variables that effect the time of rising (like amount of starter in the dough, types of flours used), temperature of the ingredients and environment being the most important ones.

See the alternative for this baking schedule at the end of the post.

FLOUR SELECTION and HYDRATION LEVEL

For this bread, I chose white wheat flour, type 500. In Slovenia, the flours are not equipped with information on the protein level of the flour, but only with type of flour, depending on the amount of bran contained. The most similar to the one I used would be bread flour in US.

Hydration level is the amount of water in the dough in regards to the total amount of the flour. If you have 1000 g of flour and 700 g of water, that’s 70% hydration.

Important note: due to the different flours used, the hydration level stated in the recipe might not apply to your flour. This is why it is very important to know how much water your flour can handle. It might handle less or more – act accordingly. What you aim for when mixing the flour, water, and sourdough starter is the consistency of the dough that feels right – both stretchy and elastic (the ability of the dough to bounce back). Too much water in the dough and you can get from elastic dough to runny dough. On the other hand, a little bit more water in the dough and you can get from tight to open crumb. It’s about balancing and the feeling in your hands.

INGREDIENTS

Sourdough starter
75 g white wheat flour
75 g water
1 tablespoon of mother sourdough starter

Dough
400 g of white wheat flour
290 g water at 30°C/86°F (72.5 % hydration of the dough)
8 g salt
150 g sourdough starter from above


STARTER


Sourdough starter

First, you will need an active and healthy mother sourdough starter. If you haven’t started one yet, download the tutorial on how to make it here.

In the evening, mix 75 g of white wheat flour (bread flour) with 75 g of water and 1 tablespoon of your mother sourdough starter. You can use a smaller jar or a smaller bowl, whaterever you prefer, however, if you use a glass jar, you will be able to see the starter’s activity better. In the morning, the volume of the starter should be doubled and there should be bubbles at the side and at the top.

DOUGH

In the evening, also mix the dough, – but only flour (400 g) and water (280 g – leave 10 g for the morning when you will mix in the salt). Why? Mixing flour with water will make the dough undergo the autolysis.
ALTERNATIVE: I sometimes skip the long overnight autolysis and instead I mix the dough in the morning and leave it in autolyse for an hour or hour and half. The best way is to experiment and to find out what suits your flour best.

Autolysis (from Greek word meaning self-digestion) is a process of the protein protease starting to break down the proteins in the flour when it’s mixed with water. Broken proteins then start realigning and forming gluten network.
When adding water to the flour, keep in mind, that the dough will relax during the night, so it’s better to start with less water and add it more in the morning if the dough feels dry.

The photo below shows the dough in the morning. We can see it’s relaxed and that the gluten strands are developed.


Beginners sourdough bread

In the morning, mix your starter into the dough and knead the dough well for couple of minutes. Next, leave it to rest for one hour before putting in the salt.


Beginners sourdough bread

After one hour has passed, add the salt and the remaining 10 g of water. Also, depending on the consistency of the dough, now it’s the time to add more water to the dough.

Next, leave the dough for the bulk fermentation. In this period, the dough should get stronger, puffed, and airy and should also increase in the volume (appr. by 30-40%).

During the bulk fermentation, you can also perform a series of stretch and fold (3-5 times in intevals of 30-45 minutes). This will help the dough to gain strength. To perform stretch and fold, grab the dough at one side, pull it up and fold it over itself. Repeat on four sides of the dough.


Beginners sourdough bread

Beginners sourdough bread

At the end of the bulk fermentation the dough should feel puffed, strong and greasy to the touch and should have nice pleasant sweet smell. Undeveloped dough in the bulk fermentation could be one of the reasons for underproofed bread.

PRESHAPING, SHAPING and FINAL RISE

Once the bulk fermentation is finished, take the dough to unfloured surface. Lightly dust it with flour, then take your bench knife or spatula and flip the dough upside down, so the floured side in on the bench now (or if you prefer – dust the bench and simply turn the dough out of the bowl).
Using the bench knife, flip the dough over itself and use hand moves the shape it into round shape.



If the dough was correctly fermented, then you will see small (or big) bubbles on the surface of the dough. Leave the dough to rest and relax for 10-15 minutes, the shaping will be easier then.


Beginners sourdough bread

In the meantime, prepare the rising basket. Cover it with a kitchen cloth and lightly dust it with flour (left photo below). Observe how the dough relaxes and spreads in ten minutes (right photo below).


Beginners sourdough bread

After ten minutes have passed, take your bench knife or spatula and carefully turn the dough upside down. Start shaping the bread by pulling the bottom part of the dough and folding it onto itself (right photo below).


Beginners sourdough bread

Next, pull the left and right side and fold them over as well. You can also continue folding left and right side to the top of the dough and folding in the next step gets easier.


Beginners sourdough bread

Fold the upper part of the dough towards the bottom, then use your hands or bench knife to roll the dough to create the tension on the surface (right photo below).


Beginners sourdough bread

Flip the dough into the rising basket smooth side down. Dust it with flour and then cover it with the rest of the cloth. Put the rising basket into the plastic bag to prevent the dough from drying out while rising. This step is especially important when your let your dough rise in the fridge.
My dough needed 3 hours at the room temperature and 1 hour in the fridge to rise fully (right photo below). The reason I put the dough in the fridge is the fact that it is much easier to score the dough if it has been left in the fridge for some time.
To check if the dough is ready to be put in the oven, gently press the dough and observe the rection of the indent. If it fills up very quickly, then it’s not ready. The dough is ready, when the indent comes back slowly and when the volume is also incresed.


Beginners sourdough bread

BAKING

At least 30 minutes before the dough is ready to be put in the oven, heat the oven along with the dough oven to the highest temperture.

When it’s heated, transfer the dough into the dutch oven. The easiest way to do it is to put a piece of parchment paper and the cutting board over the rising basket and then simply flip it.


Beginners sourdough bread

Score the dough using a blade, scissors or sharp knife. Cover the dutch oven with a lid and transfer the dutch oven to the oven. Bake for 20 minutes at 240°C (464°F), then take the lid off (right photo below) and bake for another 20-25 minutes (or until golden brown) at 230°C (464°F).


Beginners sourdough bread

When the bread is baked, take it out of the dutch oven and leave it on the cooling rack to cool down before cutting.

If the dough was properly fermented, the crust should be thick, crunchy, and brown and the bottom of the bread should be properly baked. Holding the bread in the hands should feel light.


Beginners sourdough bread

The crumb should be open and tender.


Beginners sourdough bread

I often make this bread in a way that I leave it to rise overnight. I prepare the dough in the late afternoon and shape it just before going to sleep. In the morning, the dough is well risen and ready to be baked. With this schedule you might reduce the amount of starter in the dough to slow down the fermentation.


Beginners sourdough bread

Ready to bake your beautiful sourdough bread?
I’m looking forward seeing your bread, let me know how it goes in the comment below!

The post Step by step beginner’s guide to perfect sourdough bread appeared first on My Daily Sourdough Bread.